Historical Marker coming to Arboretum Oct. 2; sneak peek at Taste Sept. 24

A new “History Lives Here” historical marker showcasing vintage photographs and descriptions of the history and evolution of the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden that was once the home of Arcadia founder Lucky Baldwin will be dedicated at 4 p.m. October 2 near the main entrance of the Arboretum.

A special first-ever preview of a mock-up of the Marker will be unveiled to attendees of the Arcadia Chamber of Commerce’s annual Taste of Arcadia at the Arboretum on Sept. 24.

Among the dignitaries in attendance will be Arboretum CEO Richard Schulhof, Los Angeles County Department of Parks & Recreation Chief Deputy John Wicker, Mayor Bob Harbicht, Mayor Pro Tem Mickey Segal, Councilman Gary Kovacic, City Manager Dominic Lazzaretto, Library and Museum Services Director Mary Beth Hayes, and City Clerk Gene Glasco.

History Lives Here marker dedicated at Santa Anita Park's 75th anniversary

This is the ninth marker dedicated by the Arcadia Historical Society in five years and the first to be entirely funded and presented by the independent Friends of the Society group which supports the Society in many ways. The tenth Marker will be dedicated this fall, coinciding with the unveiling of a new life-size statue of Lucky Baldwin.

Among the little-seen photographs presented on the Arboretum Marker will be an 1889 painting by H. H. Cross of Baldwin and daughter Anita sitting with dogs near the famous lake in front of the guest cottage (now called the Queen Anne Cottage); Lucky Baldwin’s nearby adobe home place of more than three decades (often called the Hugo Reid adobe, though Reid never lived there); and postcard views of the Baldwin Ranch, circa 1905, referred to by the Los Angeles Times in 1893 as one of the most beautiful botanical gardens in the world.

The 127-acre Arboretum was the heart of the sprawling Rancho Santa Anita, originally an outpost of Mission San Gabriel. Baldwin purchased 8,500 acres of Rancho Santa Anita in 1875 and eventually owned nearly 50,000 acres of today’s San Gabriel Valley before he died in 1909. His daughter Anita maintained her father’s beloved Santa Anita home site for decades but was forced to sell it in 1936 due to financial burdens created by the Great Depression. In 1947, the new owners, a real estate syndicate headed by the Chandler family (longtime owners of the Los Angeles Times) sold the prime property surrounding the adobe and cottage at less than market value to an ambitious group of horticulturists backed by the County and the State for the purpose of create an Arboretum. History still lives here because of their efforts.

The series of Historical Markers are part of the non-profit Society’s mission to create broader public awareness of noteworthy historical events, people, and landmarks in Arcadia. The Society’s first Historical Marker was presented during the Centennial Celebration of First Avenue Middle School in October 2007. Others since then: Los Angeles County’s Arcadia Park near the peacock fountain; the original City Hall on the northwest corner of Huntington Drive and First Avenue; the Woman’s Club of Arcadia on First Avenue; three presented during 75th Anniversary dedications for the Arcadia Chamber of Commerce, Santa Anita Park, and Adams’ Pack Station; and most recently The Derby restaurant last year.

Gene Glasco is president of the Arcadia Historical Society.
Sandy Snider researched, wrote and coordinated the photographs for the Derby, Arboretum, and upcoming Lucky Baldwin markers as a member of the Society’s Historical Marker Committee chaired by myself, Scott Hettrick, with assistance by Marker committee member Carol Libby.

– By Scott Hettrick

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